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Reporter : Kang Hyun-kyung
Tue, December 6, 2022 | 20:16
Domestic politics presents major stumbling block to Korea-Japan relations
In Korea-Japan relations, it is commonly said among Korean experts that the ball is in Japan's court. In other words, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida holds the key, particularly following his party's big win in the Upper House elections earlier this month. Thus, it's important how he will respond to President Yoon Suk-yeol's repeated calls to sit down for a summit to di...
Don't let first lady outshine president, says Daegu mayor
Daegu Mayor Hong Joon-pyo has shared some advice in a Facebook post to help President Yoon Suk-yeol stay in control of state affairs amid Yoon being trapped in falling approval ratings. Hong singled out the first lady, the founder and president of her “fan club” and a group of Yoon's confidants who are called by the Korean acronym, “Yoon-haek-kwan,” or President Yoon's inner ...
Unification Church claims its members face death threats over Abe's death
The Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, better known as the Unification Church, claimed that the church and its members in Japan faced death threats and hate crimes following the assassination of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The threats were reactions to “abusive” donation practices of the church, founded by self-claimed messiah Moon Sun-myung in 1954 in S...
He shares tips for happier, more fulfilling life
CHUNCHEON - Son Woong-jung, the father of English Premier League club Tottenham Hotspur striker Son Heung-min, encouraged aspiring football players to live the life they want, rather than one they feel they're simply supposed to live. He raised the question, “What is happiness?” in order to share his own definition of a happier, more fulfilling life, during an exclusive inter...
New video shows North Korean fishermen desperately resisting deportation at DMZ
The Ministry of Unification on Monday released a four-minute video of two North Korean fishermen who were handed over to the North in November 2019, showing one of them frantically resisting repatriation. The video was made public about a week after the ministry released 10 photos that documented how they were sent back to the North at the inter-Korean border area. The photos...
Few signs of anti-Korean hate crimes in Japan after Abe's death
The Consulate General of South Korea in Japan's Fukuoka prefecture created an uproar on July 8, the day when Japan's former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was assassinated by an unemployed 41-year-old Japanese man named Tetsuya Yamagami. After the shocking news, South Korea's Consulate General uploaded a social media post warning Koreans in Japan about their safety, mentioning the...
Yoon's confidant to lead ruling party as acting chairman
Chairman Lee Jun-seok's defiance against a decision by the ruling People Power Party's (PPP) ethics committee to suspend his party membership for six months ended up being a storm in a tea cup. Earlier, he had threatened not to approve the ethics committee's decision in the party's decision-making Supreme Council meeting, saying that he was in charge. On Monday, a consensus h...
President Yoon's approval rating falls: poll
President Yoon's declining approval ratings have raised a red flag as they have reached the point where public disapproval of his performance in the nation's top job is actually higher than public approval of it.The latest poll conducted by RnSearch on 1,028 adults from July 2 to 4 showed that 53 percent of the respondents think President Yoon is not doing a good job, whereas...
Ruling party's odd man out
Around this time last year, Lee Jun-seok, who was then the newly elected leader of the People Power Party (PPP), had been at the peak of his career since he had entered politics in 2011. What he did and said made the nation's news headlines. The media frenzy about him is owed partly to the unprecedented record he set in Korean politics: Lee, who was then 36, is the first Kore...
'Thanks America': Korean honors fallen US soldiers
While visiting many different U.S. cities over the past five decades since he arrived in the country in 1967 as a Korean immigrant, Sung-yull Koo, 79, was surprised to learn that Korean War Monuments are almost everywhere. Even small cities and counties, with which Koreans are not familiar, have war memorials in remembrance of the bloodiest war since World War II
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