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Posted : 2012-03-15 17:48
Updated : 2012-03-15 17:48

Between life and death carved in your palms

By Janet Shin

I have lived a life travelling many countries for various reasons. And they were mostly underdeveloped and sometimes dangerous.

For someone like me, who was intrigued by fate, physical hazards, such as war, terrorism and epidemic disease were not major factors to fear. I had to fight more against the mental frailty and complicated relationships among different interest groups.

It wasn’t a rare experience to travel when there were global influenza pandemics, SARS, the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, Sri Lanka’s civil war and kidnappings in Central America.

A restaurant where I often stop by for a quick meal in between meetings was mobbed by armed robbers right after my visit and all the diners in that restaurant had everything stolen.

Fortunately, I walked out of the dangerous places without being wounded or suffering losses. I had strong guts to digest and enjoy most local foods and sound body to endure intensive itineraries.



This unnecessary conceit, however, became weathered and modest after experiencing more lives and learning saju.

One of my acquaintances was a CEO, relocated overseas to manage major plants in Third World countries. Owing to his warm and kind personality from the profundity of diverse life experience, I used to visit his office whenever I traveled to the country he was staying. Then one day, I was told the shocking news that he had been kidnapped. Mercifully he was released after several weeks of confinement, but he had been shot many times.

Later, I was able to meet him in person. Surprisingly he could walk, talk and use his arms and legs without difficulty. He explained with equanimity, his story about the critical moments and how he survived.

There was nationwide news about Captain Seok Hae-gyun, who was seriously wounded by Somali pirates and survived the rescue process and long operations. Everybody was concerned about his health because his situation was critical. Thankfully, it was reported later on that he had fully recovered.

There are more stories about those who survived from desperately dangerous accidents. They just sound like exceptional cases which one might experience once in a lifetime or never happen to an ordinary person. However, if we look around, we may find more cases than we first imagined.



Here is a photo of a palm. It is that of a person who barely evaded a building collapsing. Look at the cross lines in between the heart and head lines. The latter is also called the intelligence line. This cross is interpreted as a mysterious one, which is usually seen on the palms of those who experience serious accidents but survive. Due to the name of this cross, you might just consider it a fortunate sign. But on second thought, you will realize this also implies a more frequent probability of accidents one will have to experience. I try to check without fail if one has this cross whenever I read palms, since it suggests certain dynamic aspects in one’s life.

One charm in palm reading is that the lines keep changing as we live our lives. People acquiring or losing certain lines depends on the alteration of their destiny. Some fortunate lines, such as sun and money lines, newly appear on our palms to indicate the change of our destiny in a positive direction. However there are also some signs, such as small islands, chains or disconnections in the middle of each line. These are what we have to cautiously check and beware of.

I used to have a mysterious cross before, but it doesn’t show on my palm anymore.

Information: Are you interested in learning more about the ancient Chinese teaching about the “Four Pillars of Destiny?” For further information, visit Janet’s website at www.fourpillarskorea.com, contact her at 010-5414-7461 or email janetshin@hotmail.com.

The writer is the president of the Heavenly Garden, a saju research center in Korea, and the author of “Learning Four Pillars.”
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